The Glory of God (Can God’s Glory be seen today?)

Uncategorized | Posted by Doris Aldrich
Jul 04 2011

July 4, 2011

John 17:21- 26

I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message, that all of them may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you…I have given them the glory that you gave me, that they may be one as we are one: I in them and you in me.  May they be brought to complete unity to let the world know that you sent me and have loved them even as you have loved Me.  … I will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for me may be in them and that I myself may be in them.

Col. 1:25-27

…I present to you the word of God in its fullness—the mystery that has been kept hidden for ages and generations, but is now disclosed to the saints.  To whom God has chosen to make known…the glorious riches of this mystery, which is CHRIST IN YOU, THE HOPE OF GLORY.

True independence can be found through the freedom we have in Christ Jesus…yet so much more!  We are to be His Glory.

In the opening of John Chapter 17, Christ says boldly, “Glory has come to me through them…so that they may be one as we are one.”  The result of the magnificent atonement purchased for us on the Cross rests here:  To be one with God brings to light the wondrous “Glory” of God.

The realization that the broken relationship with God our Father is so completely restored through the righteous life and death of His Son, Jesus Christ, fills us with awe and unspeakable joy.  To know that we are filled with the precious gift of God’s Spirit is indeed the “Glory of God” that has been referred to throughout all of Scripture.

As a Believer, you are the Glory of God, a gift through the Atonement and the Redemptive work of Christ.  You have become the unveiling of the Great Mystery, which is Christ in you.

In the Old Testament, the shining reality of the “Oneness of the Godhead and the Godhead in us” was seen by Moses as God passed by Him.  The pure love and holiness of this act of redemption (that was to come to earth for all mankind) was to turn the hair of Moses white and make his face to reflect brightly this truth of God for all the nation to see, the supernatural light that reveals the face of Jesus.

1.    How does this truth of “Christ In You” affect you?

2.    How do you at times “reflect” this image of redemption?  Do you feel you are God’s Glory?

3.    How do you truly forgive others as God In Christ has forgiven you?

Uncategorized | Posted by Doris Aldrich
May 31 2011

WTW LogoWith Memorial Day on the way, our hope for staff and friends is that they will take some time out from backyard fun and blazing  barbecue to remember the root of this holiday.  We suggest that you have your family members contact a soldier or verteran, thanking him or her for the bravery and courage in protecting our country.  This is the time to express your patriotism.  This is the time to express your appreciation to all those who have provided this nation with personal sacrifices through military service.

Keep in mind that, “In God We Trust” gives encouragement to our children, and brings peace to the nations.

We wish you a restful and memorable Memorial Day celebration.

Doris

“Rescuing women and children from poverty, dependency and abuse since 1985″

Women to the World

CHRISTIAN MARTYRS

Uncategorized | Posted by Doris Aldrich
Aug 14 2010

In trying to make sense of the recent death of a Christian friend to our children, we were reminded of the words of George McDonald:  We should teach our children to think no more of their bodies when dead than they do of their hair when cut off, or of their old clothes when they have done with them.

Our dear friends were captured, then brutally murdered one by one.  Their martyrdom has deeply moved all of us who worked side-by-side throughout the years with those who gave up their lives in the rugged mountains of their beloved Afghanistan.

We find strength in remembering the Christian martyrs that have gone on before, and hold to those same hopes for ourselves as we continue our work in Afghanistan and other remote areas of Central Asia.

This poem strengthened John and Betty Stam, martyred in China, during the dangerous Chinese Revolution.  They should have feared for their lives, but when a bandit placed a gun to the head of a fellow missionary, the bandit threatened by saying, “I am going to kill you.  Aren’t you afraid?”  “No, I am not afraid,” he replied, “If you kill me, I will go right to God.”

We may confess similar emotions, but we are often unable to give the reasons for the Hope that within us.  We embrace fear because we are uninformed.

This poem is relevant, and I can hear the voice of my good friend, Dr. Tom Little, voicing his own version of this poem, knowing the end is near.

“Afraid? Of What?

To feel the spirit’s glad release?

To pass from pain to perfect peace,

The strife and strain of life to cease?

Afraid—of that?

Afraid?  Of What?

Afraid to see the Savior’s Face,

To hear his welcome, and to trace

The glory gleam from wounds of grace?

Afraid—of that?

Afraid?  Of What?

A flash, a crash, a pierced heart!

Darkness, light, O Heaven’s art!

A wound of His a counterpart?

Afraid—of that?

Afraid?  Of What?

To do by death what life could not—

Baptized with blood a stony plot,

Till souls shall blossom from the spot?

Afraid—of that?

This poem, written by E. H. Hamilton, after hearing of the death of his dear friends in China, continues to comfort us as we consider the choices that lay before us in our work.

At these times of loss and heartache, we recall the words of Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland (1274-1329), minutes before his death, “Now, God be with you, my dear children.  I have breakfasted with you and shall sup with my Lord Jesus Christ.”

Holding tight our resolve, we must test ourselves to know if this is true in our own hearts.

In Philippians we find the three great desires that drove the apostles.  One was to be found in Christ (Philippians 3:9)  the other was to magnify Christ (Philippians 1:20); and the third was to be with Christ (Philippians 1:23).  Thomas Watson pulled together this trio of Truth for you and me.  Yet, we must answer for ourselves if we are able to embrace fully these words:  “For I am in a strait betwixt two, having a desire to depart, and to be with Christ; which is far better:…”

There is no greater pleasure than to remember Tom Little as a walking example of the Apostle’s mighty words of his life goal:  “According to my earnest expectation and my hope, that in nothing I shall be ashamed, but that with all boldness, as always, so now also Christ shall be magnified in my body, whether it be by life, or by death.  For to me to live is Christ, and to die is gain.”  For all who worked, studied, imagined, and prayed with Tom, this was the unwritten message of his life here on Earth.

For such a life as Tom’s has registered this genuine proof to an entire nation.

How are we to grieve the loss?  My prayer is that all those like-minded servants, like Tom Little, who have gone before – will find us faithful…faithful to the honored call of serving these same precious people through our own lives, in the body or outside the body.

Are we willing to abandon the comforts of Western life for such a glorious hope? Which is far better for you?  Which is far better for me?

Now is the time to answer the question.

We are thankful for Tom’s consistent life-message that will prove to drive us on to the end of our task.

Doris Aldrich

President

Women to the World

2010